The Don’ts when wearing Braces

THE NO-NO LIST!

STICKY, CHEWY FOODS

braces and invisalign
TAFFY
GUMMI BEARS
CARAMELS
NOW-N-LATERS
STARBURST
TOOTSIE ROLLS
*** ABSOLUTELY NO CHEWING GUM ***
SKITTLES
SUGAR DADDY
LICORICE

The suction from chewing on these types of foods will wash away the cement that holds the bands on your back teeth. Even if you do not notice loose bands right away, decay could develop under the bands where the cement has washed away.

HARD, CRUNCHY FOODS

PRETZELS
DORITOS
COMBOS
NUTS
PEANUT BRITTLE
POPCORN
ICE
TACO SHELLS
CORN CHIPS

These types of food will bend archwires, loosen bands and pop off brackets. Popcorn is not allowed. Even though it is not hard, the husks can get lodged between the bands and the gums and can cause inflammation, soreness and could lead to an infection. We also ask that you stay away from mints, and suckers because biting down on them just once could cause damage.

A few more words of advice… Cut or tear foods such as raw vegetables, pizza crust, candy bars, pickles, etc. into bite-size pieces before eating them. Also, don’t bite your fingernails or chew on pens or pencils. Be careful when eating fried chicken and cut corn on the cob off of the cob.

While you are in treatment you are allowed three loose or broken appliances. After the third there will be a charge for each appliance. If you notice that anything is loose or broken, notify us before your appointment so that we can allow for time to repair your appliances or reschedule as necessary.

Although it may seem that “all the good things in life” are on this list, don’t feel deprived! If you will follow our directions your treatment will go smoothly and you will be out of braces before you know it! And remember, our patients are special to us. If you have any questions along the way, feel free to ask – that’s what we are here for.
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Adult treatment

Braces aren’t just for kids anymore. Tooth alignment can be changed at any age if your gums and bone structure are healthy. We offer a variety of treatments that are designed for different age groups – including adults. A new smile can begin today.

Orthodontic treatment at later stages in life can dramatically improve your personal appearance and self-esteem. Improving the health of your teeth and gums is equally important. Crooked teeth and a bad bite can contribute to gum and bone loss, tooth decay, abnormal wear of the tooth enamel and surfaces, headaches and jaw joint (TMJ/TMD) pain.

Good news! The new techniques and appliances we use greatly reduce discomfort levels, decrease the frequency of visits, shorten treatment time and may allow you to choose from several options. Your options may include metal braces, translucent braces or transparent aligners that can be worn at night to improve mild cases of misaligned teeth.

During the initial examination, we will be able to determine the best possible treatment for your individual needs. During this initial examination, we can outline the treatment plan, time of treatment expected and the approximate cost.

A large percentage of our patients are adults, and they agree that it’s never too late to improve their greatest asset – their smile.

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Early treatment

When is the best time to begin orthodontics?
Though an orthodontist can enhance a smile at any age, there is an optimal time period to begin treatment. Beginning treatment at this time ensures the greatest result and the least amount of time and expense. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that the initial orthodontic evaluation should occur at the first sign of orthodontic problems or no later than age 7. At this early age, orthodontic treatment may not be necessary, but vigilant examination can anticipate the most advantageous time to begin treatment.

What are the benefits of early orthodontic evaluation?
Early evaluation provides both timely detection of problems and greater opportunity for more effective treatment. Prudent intervention guides growth and development, preventing serious problems later. When orthodontic intervention is not necessary, an orthodontist can carefully monitor growth and development and begin treatment when it is ideal.

Why is age 7 considered the optimal time for screening?
By the age of 7, the first adult molars erupt, establishing the back bite. During this time, an orthodontist can evaluate front-to-back and side-to-side tooth relationships. For example, the presence of erupting incisors can indicate possible overbite, open bite, crowding or gummy smiles. Timely screening increases the chances for an incredible smile.

What are the advantages of interceptive treatment?
Some of the most direct results of interceptive treatment are:

Creating room for crowded, erupting teeth
Creating facial symmetry through influencing jaw growth
Reducing the risk of trauma to protruding front teeth
Preserving space for unerupted teeth
Reducing the need for tooth removal
Reducing treatment time with braces
Are you a candidate for orthodontic treatment?
Orthodontics are not merely for improving the aesthetics of the smile; orthodontic treatment improves bad bites (malocclusions). Malocclusions occur as a result of tooth or jaw misalignment. Malocclusions affect the way you smile, chew, clean your teeth or feel about your smile.

Why should malocclusions be treated?
According to studies by the American Association of Orthodontists, untreated malocclusions can result in a variety of problems. Crowded teeth are more difficult to properly brush and floss, which may contribute to tooth decay and/or gum disease. Protruding teeth are more susceptible to accidental chipping. Crossbites can result in unfavorable growth and uneven tooth wear. Openbites can result in tongue-thrusting habits and speech impediments. Ultimately, orthodontics does more than make a pretty smile—it creates a healthier you.

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Emergencies

What to do in case of emergency
Call our office as soon as possible if you break or loosen any of your appliances. Please do not come directly to the office – by calling us, you will allow us to create a time to see you. Even if you have a regular appointment scheduled, call us immediately to notify us if you need an appliance repaired.

Loose brackets or bands
Call our office immediately for advice if a bracket or wire is loosened. The bracket may need to be re-fitted as soon as possible. You may have a situation that requires cutting a wire or sliding a bracket off a wire at night or over the weekend. If you need to cut a wire in case of emergency, you may use fingernail clippers that have been washed and sterilized in alcohol. Please call our office the next business day, so that we may schedule an appointment for you.

Wire irritations

Sometimes discomfort caused by a wire on your braces can be resolved by moving the wire away from the irritated area with a cotton swab or eraser. If the wire will not move, try covering the end of it with a small piece of cotton or a small amount of wax. If the wire is painful, you can cut it with nail clippers or scissors that have been washed and sterilized in alcohol. If you cannot resolve the wire irritation, call our office for an appointment.

Lost separators
Most patients lose a separator during their treatment. Do not worry about losing a separator, but call our office to see if it needs to be replaced.

Discomfort with Orthodontic Treatment
During the first week after your braces are in place and routine adjustments are complete, you will likely feel some pain, soreness or discomfort. You may take acetaminophen or other non-aspirin pain relievers while you adjust to your new braces. A warm wash cloth or heating pad may reduce the soreness in your jaws.

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Bite Problems

Bite Problems

Upper Front Teeth Protrusion
The appearance and function of your teeth are impacted by this type of bite. It is characterized by the upper teeth extending too far forward or the lower teeth not extending far enough forward.

Overbite
The upper front teeth extend out over the lower front teeth, sometimes causing the lower front teeth to bite into the roof of the mouth.

Crossbite
The upper teeth sit inside the lower teeth, which may cause tooth stratification and misaligned jaw growth.

Openbite
Proper chewing is impacted by this type of bite, in which the upper and lower front teeth do not overlap. Openbite may cause a number of unwanted habits, such as tongue thrusting.

Other Problems

Crowding
Crowding occurs when teeth have insufficient room to erupt from the gum. Crowding can often be corrected by expansion, and many times, tooth removal can be avoided.

Spacing
Spacing problems may be caused by missing teeth, or they may only be a cosmetic or aesthetic issue.

Dental midlines not matched
This type of problem is caused when the back bite does not fit and match appropriately, which may negatively impact jaw and proper dental function.

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F & Q about Orthodontic Treatment

1) Is it required that my family dentist schedule my appointment with the orthodontist?
2) At what age should I schedule an appointment for an orthodontic screening?
3) Will my teeth straighten out as they grow?
4) How do I schedule an appointment for an initial exam?
5) What will happen at the initial examination appointment?
6) What will I learn from the initial examination?
7) Will I need to have teeth extracted for braces?
8) How long will it take to complete treatment?
9) How much will braces cost? Are financing options available? How does my insurance work?
10) How often will I have appointments?
11) Can I schedule all of my appointments after school?
12) Can I drop my child off for an appointment?
13) Do braces hurt?
14) Can I return to school the day I receive my braces?
15) Do you give shots?
16) Do you use recycled braces?
17) Can I still play sports?
18) Do I need to see my family dentist while in braces?
19) Are there foods I cannot eat while I have braces?
20) How often should I brush my teeth while in braces?
21) What is an emergency appointment? How are those handled?
22) Can orthodontic correction occur while a child has baby teeth?
23) What is Phase One (early) Treatment?
24) Will my child need full braces if he/she has Phase One treatment?
25) Will my child need an expander?
26) Is it too late to have braces if I am already an adult?
27) Can I wear braces even though I have crowns and missing teeth?
28) Why should you choose an orthodontic specialist?

1. Is it required that my family dentist schedule my appointment with the orthodontist?
No, it is not. Many of our patients are referred by their family dentist, yet many other patients take the initiative to schedule an examination themselves.
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2. At what age should I schedule an appointment for an orthodontic screening?
The American Association of Orthodontists recommends an orthodontic screening at age 7. By this age, several permanent teeth in most children have erupted, allowing us to effectively evaluate your orthodontic condition.
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3. Will my teeth straighten out as they grow?
No, they will not. The space available for the front teeth does not increase as you grow. In most people, after the permanent molars erupt, the space available for the front teeth decreases with age.
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4. How do I schedule an appointment for an initial exam?
If you or your child can potentially benefit from orthodontic treatment, simply call our office, send us an e-mail or fill out our appointment request form online. We will be happy to schedule an appointment for you. When you call to schedule your appointment, our front office staff will request some basic information from you.
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5. What will happen at the initial examination appointment?
Upon arriving, each patient and parent will be seen by the staff and doctor who will acclimate you to our office and prepare for the initial exam. We will take the necessary photographs and X-rays to allow us to make a proper diagnosis. The doctor will then complete a brief, but thorough, exam.

6. What will I learn from the initial examination?
There are five essential questions that we will cover during the initial examination:

· Is there an orthodontic problem, and if so, what is it?
· What must be done to correct the problem?
· Will any teeth need to be removed?
· How long will the treatment take to complete?
· How much will the treatment cost?

7. Will I need to have teeth extracted for braces?
Removing teeth is sometimes required to achieve the best orthodontic result. Straight teeth and a balanced facial profile are the goal of orthodontics. However, because new technology has provided advanced orthodontic procedures, removing teeth is not always necessary for orthodontic treatment.
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8. How long will it take to complete treatment?
Treatment time obviously depends on each patient’s specific orthodontic problem. In general, treatment times range from 12 to 30 months. The “average” time frame a person is in braces is approximately 22 months.
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9. How much will braces cost? Are financing options available? How does my insurance work?
It is impossible to give an exact cost for treatment until we have examined you. We will cover the exact cost and financial options during the initial examination. We have many financing options available to accommodate your needs, and we will review these with you. We will also review your insurance policy and help to maximize your benefit and file your claims.
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10. How often will I have appointments?
Appointments are scheduled according to each patient’s needs. Most patients in braces will be seen every five to 10 weeks. If there are specific situations that require more frequent monitoring, we will schedule appointments accordingly.
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11. Can I schedule all of my appointments after school?
Unfortunately, we cannot schedule all appointments for students during after-school hours. However, because most appointments are scheduled five to 10 weeks apart, most patients will miss minimal school due to their orthodontic treatments. We will, however, make a sincere effort to meet your scheduling needs.
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12. Can I drop my child off for an appointment?
Yes. We understand your busy schedule, and we are happy to help you make the most of your time. On some occasions, we may request to speak with a parent when they return, so we ask that parents check in with their patient manager before dropping off their child.
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13. Do braces hurt?
Generally, braces do not “hurt.” After certain visits, teeth may be sore for a few days. In these situations, pain medications such as Advil or Tylenol will ease the discomfort. However, after most visits, patients do not feel any soreness at all! We often remind our patients, “It does not have to hurt to work!”
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14. Can I return to school the day I receive my braces?
Yes. There is no reason to miss school because of an orthodontic appointment.
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15. Do you give shots?
No. Shots are not necessary in orthodontic treatment.
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16. Do you use recycled braces?
Absolutely not! It is our belief that each patient should be provided with their own braces to achieve the best orthodontic result possible.
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17. Can I still play sports?
Yes. We recommend a mouth guard for all sports.
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18. Do I need to see my family dentist while in braces?
Yes! Regular checkups with your family dentist are important while in braces. Your family dentist will determine the intervals between cleaning appointments while you are in braces.
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19. Are there foods I cannot eat while I have braces?
Yes. Once treatment begins, we will explain the complete instructions and provide a comprehensive list of foods to avoid. Some of those foods include: ice, hard candy, raw vegetables and all sticky foods (i.e. caramel and taffy). You can avoid most emergency appointments to repair broken or damaged braces by carefully following our instructions.
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20. How often should I brush my teeth while in braces?
Patients should brush their teeth at least four times each day – after each meal and before going to bed. We will show each patient how to floss their teeth with braces and may also provide a prescription for a special fluoride, if necessary.
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21. What is an emergency appointment? How are those handled?
If your braces are causing extreme pain or if something breaks, you should call our office. In most cases, we can address these issues over the telephone. If you require an emergency appointment, we will set aside time for you.
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22. Can orthodontic correction occur while a child has baby teeth?
Yes. Some orthodontic problems are significant enough to require early intervention. However, if a patient is not yet ready for treatment, we will follow that patient’s growth and development until the time is right for treatment to begin.
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23. What is Phase One (early) Treatment?
Phase One treatment, if necessary, is usually initiated on children between the ages of 7 and 10. Phase One treatment lasts about 12-21 months. The primary objective for Phase One treatment is to address significant problems to prevent them from becoming more severe and to improve self-esteem and self-image.
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24. Will my child need full braces if he/she has Phase One treatment?
It is best to assume that your child will need full braces even after Phase One treatment. The period following Phase One treatment is called the “resting period,” during which growth and tooth eruption are closely monitored. Throughout this period, parents and patients will be kept informed of future treatment recommendations.
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25. Will my child need an expander?
At the completion of the initial examination, we will determine whether a patient will need an expander.
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26. Is it too late to have braces if I am already an adult?
A surprising percentage of our patients are adults. In fact, 25 percent of all orthodontic patients are adults. Health, happiness and self-esteem are vitally important to adults. No patient is “too old” to wear braces!
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27. Can I wear braces even though I have crowns and missing teeth?
Yes. A tooth with a crown will move just like a tooth with a simple filling. When teeth are missing, orthodontic treatment will aid in the alignment of the remaining teeth.
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28. Why should you choose an orthodontic specialist?
Teeth, and sometimes entire facial structures, are permanently changed by orthodontic treatment. It is important that the treatment be appropriate and properly completed. Orthodontic specialists have extensive and specialized training that enables them to provide their patients with professional, personalized treatments.
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Oral Hygiene

BRUSHING & FLOSSING

The best way to ensure a clean and healthy smile is brushing and flossing. Food particles can accumulate on teeth and in braces, and over time, turn into plaque. The bacteria that results from this accumulation can lead to gum disease, tooth decay and even loss of teeth. To avoid these problems while you are in orthodontic treatment, take special care of your braces, teeth and gums to ensure you will have the best possible result.

BRUSHING
Use a toothbrush with soft bristles and a small strip of fluoride toothpaste. When you brush your teeth, move the brush in small, circular motions to reach food particles that may be under your gum line. Hold the toothbrush at an angle and brush slowly and carefully, covering all areas between teeth, between braces and the surface of each tooth. It will take you several minutes to thoroughly brush your teeth. Brush up on the lower teeth, down on the upper teeth and the outside, inside and chewing surface of your front and back teeth. Brush your tongue and the roof of your mouth before you rinse.

Especially during orthodontic treatment, brush your teeth four times daily to avoid the accumulation of food particles in your teeth and braces:

In the morning after breakfast
After lunch or right after school
After supper
At bedtime
You will need to replace your toothbrush more often due to your appliances. As soon as the bristles start to wear down or fray, replace your toothbrush with a new one. It may be difficult for your toothbrush to reach some areas under your archwire. Do not swallow any toothpaste; rinse your mouth thoroughly with water after you finish brushing. It is important to floss and use an antibacterial mouthwash and fluoride treatment throughout your orthodontic treatment and beyond for optimal oral hygiene.

FLOSSING
For areas between the teeth that a toothbrush can’t reach, use dental floss to remove food particles and plaque. Flossing takes more time and patience when you are wearing braces, but it is important to floss your teeth every day.

Use the reusable floss threader provided by our office to floss under your archwire daily. Pull a small length of floss from the dispenser through the threader and slide it up and down along the front of each tooth. You will be able to feel when the tooth is clean and hear the squeak of the floss against your clean teeth. Use care around your archwire and do not floss too forcefully around it or put too much pressure on it. After you floss between your archwire and braces, floss between your other teeth and gums.

If you are flossing without the floss threader, pull a small length of floss from the dispenser. Wrap the ends of the floss tightly around your middle fingers. Guide the floss between all teeth to the gum line, pulling out food particles or plaque. Unwrap clean floss from around your fingers as you go, so that you have used the floss from beginning to end when you finish. Floss behind all of your back teeth.

Floss at night to make sure your teeth are clean before you go to bed. When you first begin flossing around your braces, your gums may bleed a little. If the bleeding does not go away after the first few times, inform a staff member at your next appointment.

ORAL HYGIENE

Interdental Toothbrush
A Proxabrush is an interdental (between the teeth) toothbrush that you may use to clean underneath and around your wires and braces. Use the Proxabrush gently to avoid damaging your wires. The Proxabrush will help you to clean your braces while maintaining healthy teeth and gums.

Antibacterial Mouthwash
Peroxyl, a hydrogen peroxide antiseptic mouth rinse, will reduce inflammation to your gums and cheeks. Peroxyl helps to prevent infection and decrease irritation that may develop from your braces. Rinse your mouth with two teaspoons of Peroxyl (half a capful) for one minute and then spit it out. You may use Peroxyl up to four times daily following your schedule for brushing: after meals (or after school) and before bed. Just like using peroxide for a scrape on your skin, Peroxyl helps the inside of your mouth heal. Peroxyl can be used for general irritation caused by your braces or for canker sores, cheek bites and other minor temporary injuries to the gums.

Topical Fluoride
Phos-Flur is a sodium fluoride gel that helps prevent tooth decay while you are wearing braces by killing bacteria and replacing minerals in tooth enamel that have been exposed to harmful acids. The use of Phos-Flur does not replace daily brushing and flossing but should be done following your daily schedule at bedtime. Place a small strip of Phos-Flur on a toothbrush and apply it to your teeth for one minute and spit it out. You may not eat or drink for 30 minutes after you use Phos-Flur. It is important for the active ingredient to stay on your teeth for 30 minutes, so do not wash it away by eating or drinking.

Cleaning Your Removable Appliance
Brush your removable appliance every day as a part of your regular brushing and flossing schedule. Because food particles and plaque can accumulate on your appliance just as they do on your teeth, soak the appliance daily. Dissolve a Polident, Efferdent or other denture-cleaning tablet in a glass of tap water at room temperature and soak your appliance once every day. Your appliance will taste better, and you will prevent plaque and bacterial accumulation.

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First Visit

We are always excited about meeting new patients during their first visit to our office. Your initial appointment will consist of a thorough examination and a discussion of potential treatment options. This important visit will give us insight into your orthodontic needs. Please visit this website Here:

During the initial examination for each patient, Dr. King will address the following questions that cover the basics of orthodontic treatment. We encourage you to ask questions as well.braces and invisalign

Is there a condition that orthodontics can address?
Is treatment needed now, or should treatment be delayed until
appropriate growth, tooth eruption or other factors have occurred?
What treatment procedures will be used to correct the problem?
Do any permanent teeth need to be removed?
How long will treatment take?
How much will it cost?
What are my payment options?

While we can often answer these general questions about treatment during the initial examination, we will address specific areas after careful analysis of the diagnostic records. We feel it is important to analyze each patient’s specific needs, because in-depth planning leads to superior results and higher patient satisfaction.

Following the initial visit, if Dr. King finds the need for treatment, then you will be scheduled for diagnostic records. Diagnostic records include
X-rays, photos and impressions for study models and are necessary for developing the appropriate treatment plan.

We will then schedule a consultation visit to discuss treatment options, time frames and financial arrangements. We insist that our patients leave the office with a clear understanding of their specific needs, what the treatment will consist of and how long it will take. Also, we will answer any additional questions.

Please assist us by providing the following information at the time of your first visit:

Any panoramic X-ray taken within the past six months.
If you have orthodontic insurance, bring your insurance card. By providing this information at the first visit, we will be able to give you an estimate of your costs. See more here

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Common Signs that You May Need Braces

Braces can correct a number of cosmetic and functional dental issues. For a list of common signs that you may need braces, read on:

Crooked Teeth

The most obvious sign that you need braces is a visible malocclusion, commonly known as crooked teeth. This is more than just a cosmetic problem: It can be difficult to keep overlapping teeth clean and poor dental hygiene leads to oral issues such as cavities. Fortunately, braces can be used to fix everything from a mildly crooked smile to teeth that are so far out of alignment that they are growing out of the gum improperly. There is a form of braces available to fix every type of malocclusion, no matter what the problem might be.

Improper Bite

An even more serious problem than crooked teeth is an improper bite, of which crooked teeth may actually be an indicator. A normal bite will align so that the molars meet in a straight line and the top front teeth come down slightly over the bottom teeth when the mouth is at rest. If your bite is not configured like this, serious problems in chewing and speaking may occur.

Jaw Pain

An improper bite can contribute to temporomandibular joint disorder, commonly known as TMJ. This condition is a direct result of a poor bite: Because the jaw is out of alignment, the jaw muscles have to compensate, which can place undue strain on them and cause pain and stiffness. This can also cause the teeth to wear down faster and more unevenly.

If you think that you could benefit from braces, contact King Orthodontics in Durham, North Carolina. We provide a number of different braces systems, including Invisalign and Damon braces. For more information, call us today at (919) 246-4433.

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Damon System Braces

Until relatively recently, orthodontia involved a massive commitment of time, energy, and money. In many cases, permanent teeth were extracted to “make room,” and the wires and rubber bands used could exert an extraordinary amount of force, causing extreme pain. Fortunately, as this video explains, the Damon System of braces doesn’t present any of these problems.

The Damon System does not exert massive pressure on teeth, and so is not acutely uncomfortable for the patient. In addition, it’s very rare that a patient will require a tooth extraction while wearing Damon braces, because Damon orthodontists understand that crooked teeth are caused by the muscles of the tongue and mouth being out of alignment, rather than a mismatch between jaw size and the number of teeth. Finally, Damon orthodontists pay close attention to the way that they reshape the dental arch so that premature aging is avoided.

If you’re interested in the possibility of Damon braces, contact King Orthodontics in Durham, North Carolina by calling (919) 246-4433.

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